What's Your Nature?

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Encounters

These snowcrystals were collected on February 7, 2018 at 3 pm. The growth of these snowcrystals and their resultant morphology was controlled by the weather conditions during their decent in the atmosphere. Basically, a snowcrystal records the chaotic series of events from deposition of water vapor on the nucleus (e.g., dust particle) to collection. Though temperature on the ground at the time of collection was -8°C, the crystals formed in different conditions in the atmosphere.

 

The snow crystal (Snowcrystal 2018.2.07b) was collected on February 7, 2018 at 11 am. Using Magano and Lee (1996) this snowflake is classified as P1a, which is a hexagonal plate. The growth of the snow crystal (and its resultant morphology) was controlled by weather conditions during its decent in the atmosphere.

The snow crystal (Snowcrystal 2018.2.07a) was collected on February 7, 2018 at 11 am. Using Magano and Lee (1996) this snowflake is classified as P1c, which is a snow crystal with broad branches. The growth of the snow crystal (and its resultant morphology) was controlled by weather conditions during its decent in the atmosphere.

St. Lawrence University - February 7th, 2018
Mixture of hexagonal (P1a) and thick plate of skeletal form (C1h). Long solid column (N1e) needles with semi-formed hollow bullets (C1d). More than one nuclei present, formed around -15 degrees with 89% average humidity. Growth was continuous through snowfall.

St. Lawrence University: February 7th, 2018
Contains: Crystal with broad branches (P1c), elementary sheath (N1c), hollow bullet (C1d) and a bundle of elementary sheaths at one location (N1d).
Temperature formed was at -15 degrees, right at the water saturation line with 89 % average humidity. There were at least two different nuclei present with changes in temperature and increased humidity occurring between the branch growth.

Saw some fresh tracks going to this shelter and the porcupine did not find it necessary to turn around and show me just a tail.

On this day, February 21st, we went to Lampson falls to observe animal tracks, and other evidence of life left behind in the snow. Lampson falls is a forest trail that follows along a river, and this particular photo was taken next to the shore of the river, in almost a wetland based habitat from water overflow. Mind you, in February, there is still supposed to be a decent amount of snow coverage. Today it was very humid, and rained heavily for many hours, exposing many tunnels in the snow that had once been covered.

On this day, February 21st, we went to Lampson falls to observe animal tracks, and other evidence of life left behind in the snow. Lampson falls is a forest trail that follows along a river, and this particular photo was taken next to the shore of the river, in almost a wetland based habitat from water overflow. Mind you, in February, there is still supposed to be a decent amount of snow coverage. Today it was very humid, and rained heavily for many hours, exposing many tunnels in the snow that had once been covered.

I saw geese returning for the first time this season early this morning, in a group of 20-30. Seems early, but with recent weather they should find plenty of open water.

After a morning of freezing rain, the blue skies in the afternoon were a great incentive to get out. This was the first time taking my dog out to the trails at Stone Valley, and she enjoyed exploring the east side of the river. She even found a porcupine - luckily safely tucked away in his den! Trail conditions were very icy, I was glad to have crampons with me and would recommend them to anyone who goes out.