What's Your Nature?

Become a Nature Up North explorer to share your encounters with wild things and wild places in New York's North Country. Post your wildlife sightings, landscape shots, photos from your outings, and even your organization's events!

Encounters

My dog and I pulled into camp and these three turkeys were visiting. They didn’t stay to chat though!!

I love these little tiny mushrooms.

Despite the recent hot streak we’ve been experiencing, Monday morning was perfect for an early paddle on 650-acre Stark Falls Reservoir in South Colton. This was also a great place for social distancing, I never saw another soul.

Stop at my camp and all the little vegetation had water droplets glistening on them. It felt fresh.

Out and about and saw a whole pond covered with these happy Water Lilies!

This butterfly was scoping out lots of things in the area and not really caring the the others were doing them he landed as if to show off his beautiful wings for me!

The beauty of nature’s colors! Such a vibrant red/orange!

Lots of butterflies at Jamestown Falls! This one was very interested in the clover.

A little visitor at my camp. I never saw a all white one before.

I always feel like I am stepping into another world when I get to my camp!

The days of social distancing have given me the opportunity to seek more local and out of the way trails & destinations. Leonard Pond (S. Colton) has been on my “to hike” list for a while. Looking over maps of the area, I noticed a small access road that starts on the west side of RT 56, across from the Jamestown Falls water access site.

The lake is now open for the rest of the season. This is a very nice paddle, I loosely followed the shoreline, and racked up about 6 miles. The western end has some great bays and channels to explore, one of which is the beginning of the south branch of the Grasse River. Pay attention to the public use dates if you decide to visit- 9/1 thru 7/15.

Thought we'd stick close to car, so chose Jamestown Falls for Sunday venture. Always a pleasure to hear a warbler, great to actually get an identifiable picture!

Just to far away for good photo!!! But happy they are back near nest.

Ruffed Grouse mom trying to lure me away. One of young not following her directions!

Heard something pecking and finally settled on a tree that did not appear to have a bird on it. Finally this nuthatch appeared.

Took a recreational field trip to Lake Massawepie with my Adirondack Literature class! We had fun paddling the lake, exploring Arcadia, the yurt village where the Adirondack Semester from St. Lawrence University is, and checking out the Massawepie Mire. We spent the whole day in the sunshine, learning about and experiencing first hand a piece of this beautiful region we've been reading about all semester

Just love seeing the colors of fall with red and orange being my personal favorite.

It was cool and dreary out. I wasn't expecting much in the line of sightings but came upon this GBH very suddenly. I sat for about 10 minutes before I dared to move for my camera. I snapped my photo and moved along.

Kayaking on Joe Indian Pond was a day of many wonders. . . I saw a heart shape in this uprooted tree!

Was walking in the woods to take various pictures and this little guy startled me!

Berries are getting close to being ready!

Very peaceful watching the geese swim in the pond.

a few flowers were starting to peek out.

This is last of three pictures captured at Lampson Falls. It is of an animal sign that I believe to be the imprint in the snow of a cotton tail rabbit. I think it is a cotton tail and not a snowshoe hare because of the size and spread of the prints. The feet of a snowshoe hare would I think be larger than this, especially the hind-feet. This photo was taken off to the side of the trail away from the Grasse River. Natural History: The Grasse River is a tributary of the St. Lawrence and had formerly served as a power source for nearby towns.

This is the last of three images of the Raquette River that runs alongside the Stone Valley trail. This image also depicts movement with the running water in the image. It contains a miniature waterfall formed by the slope of the landscape. Natural History: Like much of the North Country the landscape of Stone Valley Park was formed by the movement of large land glaciers and ice sheets many thousands of years ago. Their movement has shaped the land and are responsible for the presence of large rocks and boulders in the area.

This is the first of three photos taken at the Stone Valley Cooperative Recreational Area, and is of the Raquette River located that runs parallel to part of the Stone Valley trail. This picture is also of running water and depicts movement or implies movement. Natural History: Like much of the North Country the landscape of Stone Valley Park was formed by the movement of large land glaciers and ice sheets many thousands of years ago. Their movement has shaped the land and are responsible for the presence of large rocks and boulders in the area.

This is the second image of three from the Stone Valley Trail system. This particular image is of a tree I saw while walking along one of the trails. It has obviously been the victim of one or more woodpeckers and I believe that this tree is some spruce or pine and perhaps even a fir or hemlock because I remember seeing a lot hemlocks that had been picked over by porcupines. Natural History: Like much of the North Country the landscape of Stone Valley Park was formed by the movement of large land glaciers and ice sheets many thousands of years ago.

This picture is the first of three pictures taken at Lampson Falls. This is landscape photograph that captures a small waterfall in the Grasse River. Natural History: The Grasse River is a tributary of the St. Lawrence and had formerly served as a power source for nearby towns. The Grasse River used to be littered with mills, but nearly no remnants of theses mills. However, the stone foundations of the mills as well as other aged sturctures can be found along its banks. Lampson Falls is located along the Grasse River, and contains many cuts and gouges in the rockface of the falls.

This picture was taken at Lampson Falls and is the second of three photos taken there. This photo is of a porcupine our class saw there while looking for animal tracks. When we found this porcupine he was making his way up this tree and continued to do so after stumbled upon him. He didn’t seem to be eating the bark of this tree, which is what I believe to be a hemlock, but was simply climbing the tree. As I stated, this photo was taken at Lampson Falls which is located on the Grasse River. Natural History: The Grasse River is a tributary of the St.

I skied into the Stone Dam Parcel from the Dean Road in Clare today. It was cold but sunny and no wind, so pretty much a perfect day. It is about a 6 mile round trip. I parked about 1/2 mile from the Stone Dam Trail as the road isn't plowed and parts of it are a snowmobile trail. The ski is very nice, it goes through the Grass River Easement, and while there has been some timber management, several mature trees remain and give the area an open forest feeling.

Traveling back roads looking for the fall colors. Racquette River always has great shots

A small mountain with big views

Perfect for a short little walk and with a little bushwhacking it offers a great view of the falls. Great finds of the day: a very large and intimidating spider, a snake skin, and a geocache box!

Saw this beautiful butterfly as we headed down the mountain. It landed on some ferns and was nice enough to pose for this picture.

A beautiful summer day on Massawepie before going for a paddle.

I was hiking to Lampson Falls when I noticed this Maple tree that had what appears to be a large amount of fungus growing on the trunk of the tree, it seemed as though the fungus was growing from the bottom near the soil and moving upwards. I though this image was interesting because earlier in the semester we had an arborist come to class and talk about trees and I remember him saying that today it is still unknown how these diseases spread from tree to tree. This tree was a Red Maple; these trees when fully mature can grow from 40 to 60 feet and they can spread up to 40 feet wide.

This photo was taken during my lab; for this lab we hiked along the Red Sand Stone trail until we reached the Grasse River. The Grasse river is 73 miles long and it is named after Francois Joseph Paul de Grasse, a French admiral who assisted American forces during the Battle of Yorktown in the Revolutionary War. The river was made up by a series of small lakes and ponds in the towns of Russel, Clifton and Clare. The Grasse river is part of what is known as the Greater St. Lawrence River Drainage Basin.

(landscape) Lampson Falls – This landscape at Lampson falls in Clare, NY gives a sense of the river and the forested background. This picture does a nice job of allowing you to see what Lampson falls is all about, with the river, but also gives you an idea of what the rest of the area is like with a glimpse of the elevation change in the background. Lampson falls is one of the more popular falls in the area, and there are a few different options of trails to take while there. The falls are about 100 feet in width and 40 feet high.

In this picture it is very easy to tell that this is a Red Squirrel print because you can clearly see all of its toes. Also it is kind of scampering like squirrels do.

A gray fox ran across the road in front of our car and stopped just off to the side, giving us a great view.

A scraggly, young red tailed hawk was spotted just off of Route 56 on a telephone pole scouting for prey

My family was walking through a bog near Sevey's Corners, and we found a Northern Damselfly.

Carnivorous pitcher plant ("Sarracenia sp.") growing amidst "Sphagnum" moss in an ombrotrophic (rain-water fed), positive-relief, palustrine wetland system (i.e., a bog) in the northern Adirondacks.

White tailed deer in a group of four foraging in the road verge. Enjoying a spring day.

While at our camp I looked out our window and someone was peeking back in at me!

It was a snowy evening at camp and my daughter had a handful of corn and a chickadee landed right in her hand to see what she was holding!

Sunset driving home from camp.