What's Your Nature?

Become a Nature Up North explorer to share your encounters with wild things and wild places in New York's North Country. Post your wildlife sightings, landscape shots, photos from your outings, and even you organization's events!

Just Our Nature

Nature Up North program blog

Leprechaun Trees

Haw berries. Photo: FreeUsePhotos, Flickr Creative Commons.

Leprechaun Trees

My earliest memory of St. Patrick’s Day is how angry it made my mother, who holds dual Irish-American citizenship and strongly identifies with her Celtic roots. It was not the day itself which got her Irish up, so to speak, but rather the way it was depicted in popular American culture: Green-beer drink specials at the bars and St. Patrick’s Day sales in every store, all endorsed by grinning, green-clad, marginally sober leprechauns.

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Finding Hope for Ash Tree Survival

Finding Hope for Ash Tree Survival

You look out your window on a mid-summer day: the sun filters through the full, bright green leaves on the big ash tree in your yard, making patterns that dance across your floor. You hear birds sing too; a pair of robins is nesting again in one of the upper branches. It’s a pretty picture, until you learn that emerald ash borer larvae (Agrilus planipennis) are slowly destroying this tree, eating away the layer just under the bark. Fast forward a few years, and the tree will be at risk of falling on your home or electric wires, and no birds will be nesting in its branches.

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Emerald Ash Borer: Getting Your Community Ready

Yellow DEC signs like this one at Heritage Park in Canton ask concerned citizens to report any signs of emerald ash borers to local authorities.

Emerald Ash Borer: Getting Your Community Ready

New York State has over 900 million ash trees. They line our streets, they shade our parks, and they’re in our yards. What would happen if those 900 million ash trees, 7% of all the trees in the state, died in only a few years?

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Nature Up North 2019 Calendar Photo Contest

Nature Up North 2019 Calendar Photo Contest

Calling all North Country nature photographers! 

Have you dusted off your camera yet this season? Well now's the time, because Nature Up North is once again hosting our annual calendar contest for nature photos that will be featured in our 2019 wall calendar.

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More Blissful Ignorance, Please

Traps like this one in Canton hang on ash trees across St. Lawrence County as part of an effort to monitor the spread of EAB. Photo: Jess LaMay.

More Blissful Ignorance, Please

It’s a rare blessing to have a job I absolutely love, but it’s not all roses. Although some of it is, literally, roses. All too often it is my dubious honor to bring to public awareness a new invasive pest or disease, and history has not always been kind to the bearers of bad news. There is an old saying that knowledge is power, but there is another one that ignorance is bliss, and some days I’d be happy to trade some alleged power for a little bliss.

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Why Did the Turtle Cross the Road?

Why Did the Turtle Cross the Road?

Many of us rely on crosswalks to safely navigate through bustling traffic, but wild animals are often not so lucky. Road kill is a major issue that continues to decrease animal abundance and biodiversity. While road signs are established for animal crossing in certain areas, there is no way to determine exactly when and where an animal will cross.

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Take A Hike: Getting Back Outdoors

View from the top of Ampersand Mountain. Photo: Ella Gurney.

Take A Hike: Getting Back Outdoors

There’s ice coating one of the boulders next to me. Water drips off of it slowly, tracing a path through some moss below. The boulder in front of me is much larger and steeper, but isn’t slippery with ice, and, looking around me, I can see that the only way forwards is up. Gritting my teeth, I grab a nearby exposed tree root that’s jutting out from the top of the boulder, dig my toes into a crack in the rock, and pull myself up.

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Welcoming Our Summer Interns

Nature Up North summer interns Jess, Maggie, and Alyssa with Project Manager Emlyn Crocker at Indian Creek Nature Center's Conservation Field Day.

Welcoming Our Summer Interns

Days are getting longer, butterflies and dragonflies are out, and it's swimming weather by North Country standards - summer is here! At the start of June we welcomed our three summer interns Alyssa LaCoy, Maggie Jensen, and Jess LaMay to the team here at Nature Up North. They'll be with us through early August, and are looking forward to spending their summer visiting farmer's markets, organizing community events and workshops, and leading hikes and paddles around the region.

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